Search
Close this search box.

7 Reasons to implement Zero Trust

Organizations wanting to defend their networks and data from online threats are increasingly adopting the security concept known as “zero trust.” Zero trust is the presumption that no person or device, inside or outside the network, is to be trusted and that all requests for access to resources must be verified.

The foundation of the conventional security paradigm is the idea that everyone inside the network is reliable and that nobody outside is. Threats can now come from everywhere and take many different forms in the modern digital environment, thus this is no longer the case. The foundation of zero trust is the idea that the network must always be secure, regardless of whether a user or device is inside or outside the network. Here are the 7 Models of Zero Trust Security architecture:

Enhanced security:

Zero trust assumes that all users and devices are not to be trusted, which allows organizations to take a proactive approach to security, rather than waiting for an attack to happen.

Reduced attack surface:

By only granting access to resources on a need-to-know basis, it becomes much harder for attackers to find a way in.

Improved visibility:

Zero trust security systems provide organizations with a comprehensive view of all network activity, enabling them to quickly detect and respond to threats.

Multi-factor authentication:

Zero trust security systems use multi-factor authentication, which makes it much more difficult for attackers to gain access to the network, as they would need to have both the password and the mobile device.

Micro-segmentation:

Zero trust security systems use micro-segmentation, which is the process of dividing the network into smaller segments, each with its own set of security rules. This makes it much harder for attackers to move laterally within the network and gain access to sensitive data.

Compliance:

Zero trust security systems can help organizations to meet regulatory and compliance requirements, such as HIPAA and PCI-DSS.

Cost-effective:

Zero trust security systems can be more cost-effective than traditional security systems, as they do not require expensive hardware or software solutions.

The usage of multi-factor authentication is one of the fundamental elements of zero trust (MFA). This implies that before receiving access to resources, users must give more than one type of verification. For instance, they might be required to input both a password and a code that was provided to their mobile device. As a result, it is significantly more difficult for attackers to access the network because they need both the mobile device and the password.

The application of micro-segmentation is a key component of zero trust. The network is being divided into smaller sections, each with its own set of security regulations. As a result, it is considerably more difficult for attackers to traverse laterally through the network and access private information.

The reduction of the attack surface is one of zero trust’s primary advantages. Making access to resources only available to those who truly need it makes it far more difficult for attackers to get entry. Additionally, companies can limit the harm that can be done if an attacker does get access to the network by adopting micro-segmentation.

Zero trust is a cutting-edge security idea that can aid enterprises in better safeguarding their networks and data. Organizations can take a proactive approach to security rather than waiting for an attack by supposing that all people and devices should not be trusted. Organizations can lessen the attack surface and restrict the harm that can be done if an attacker does manage to access the network by utilizing multi-factor authentication and micro-segmentation.

For more information on Zero trust security implementation contact to ITAdOn.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *